California

Gualala River

Conserving a lifeline for California salmon and steelhead

Gualala River
Silva Ranch on the Gualala River.
Photography | Jason Hartwick
Gualala River
Silva Ranch on the Gualala River.
Photography | Jason Hartwick
Gualala River
Coho salmon.
Photography | Tom and Pat Leeson
Gualala River
Silva Ranch on the Gualala River.
Photography | Jason Hartwick
Gualala River
Silva Ranch on the Gualala River.
Photography | Jason Hartwick
Gualala River
Silva Ranch on the Gualala River.
Photography | Jason Hartwick
Gualala River
Silva Ranch on the Gualala River.
Photography | Jason Hartwick

Flowing from the rugged slopes of northern California’s Coast Range, the Gualala River is an exceptional free-flowing river with three main forks: the South Fork, the North Fork and, the largest of the three, the Wheatfield Fork. The Gualala supports an abundance of wildlife at the edge of a region that has experienced significant development during the last 50 years. On its 40-mile journey to the Pacific, the Gualala courses through a mosaic of redwood forest, mixed conifer forests and oak woodlands that provide important habitat for numerous threatened, endangered and sensitive species. These remaining expanses of California forest and woodlands are crucial to fish and wildlife and provide critical watershed functions for rivers like the Gualala. They are also important as open space for towns throughout the region, while the area’s working forests and ranches provide income for families and revenue for local economies.

The Gualala River is home to threatened Northern California Coast winter steelhead and endangered Central California Coast coho salmon, two crucial populations of imperiled anadromous fish whose future hinges on the health of rivers like the Gualala. The river is also home to the Gualala roach, a distinct species of minnow that is endemic to the river and has been isolated to the watershed for thousands of years.

Western Rivers Conservancy has embarked on an effort to conserve the 4,344-acre Silva Ranch, located on the Wheatfield Fork in the headwaters of the Gualala River. Our goal is to protect an important reach of the Wheatfield Fork, as well as a series of headwater tributaries that provide invaluable clean, cold water to the Gualala River and crucial spawning and rearing habitat for imperiled anadromous fish. Our efforts will preserve over 40 acres of old-growth redwood forest and more than 2,600 acres of hardwood forest and oak woodland.

To accomplish this, we are working with the owners of the ranch, in partnership with public agencies and private funders, to place a conservation easement on the property that will permanently protect habitat crucial to California’s fish and wildlife. Conservation of the property, which lies adjacent to more than 75,000 acres of protected land, will also improve habitat connectivity on a scale far beyond the Silva property itself.

The ranch has potential for dozens of home sites and extensive grape production, which the easement will prevent or severely limit. It will allow only five percent of the ranch to be used for agriculture, providing an economic resource for the landowner and a benefit to the local economy. The Silva family will continue to work these non-conservation lands to generate income while we realize together our shared goal of conserving the forests and riparian areas throughout the ranch.

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